Research Reports

ByNWBC Council

Women-Owned Businesses and the Supply Chain

Women-Owned Businesses and the Supply Chain

Women-owned businesses (WOBs) with business-to-business (B2B) sales tend to have higher revenue and better access to capital. This infographic examines descriptive statistics on women-owned businesses in the B2B market, and offers a look at the story of one woman–Stacy Madison of Stacy’s Pita Chips–who grew her company’s revenue into the millions by starting with sales to regional and gourmet food stores.

ByNWBC Council

High Growth Women-Owned Businesses’ Access to Capital

High Growth Women-Owned Businesses’ Access to Capital

New Research Shows that Women-Owned Firms Exceed Growth Expectations, but Still Lack Access to Capital

Background:

In our 2012 annual report, the NWBC stated that getting more money into the hands of women entrepreneurs continues to be a top priority in order to help women start and grow their businesses. Research on this issue is a crucial first step in facilitating this change.  Some researchers attribute women’s lower levels of participation in growth-oriented entrepreneurship to gender differences in key resource inputs, including financial capital. Recent studies indicate that women entrepreneurs raise lower amounts of capital to finance their firms, and are more reliant on personal rather than external sources of financing, than their male counterparts. The report summarized here seeks to explore differences between men and women business owners regarding firm growth, amount and sources of financial capital, and the relationship between the two.  By understanding these issues, we can help promote policies that enable women to fund the start and growth of their businesses.

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ByNWBC Council

Quantitative Research on the Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program

Quantitative Research on the Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program Report

The Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program (WOSB FCP) aims to reduce the inequity in award and distribution of prime Federal contracts to Women-Owned Small Businesses (WOSBs). The WOSB FCP includes policies designed to promote WOSB Federal procurement activity, such that WOSBs procure at least 5 percent of total prime Federal contracts in a given year. The principal mechanisms available to increase WOSB participation in Federal procurement are “set-asides,” in which contracting agencies set aside certain Federal contracts specifically for WOSBs in an effort to reach the 5 percent contracting objective.

The primary focus of our analysis was to evaluate the impact of the WOSB FCP on the participation of and awards granted to women-owned small businesses. Of principal interest was whether WOSBs are meeting procurement thresholds of 5 percent (in both contract number and dollar amount) of total Federal prime contracting awards since the implementation of the WOSB FCP rules in 2011.

ByNWBC Council

Procurement Statistics Revealed Great Gains for Women-Owned Small Businesses

Procurement Statistics Revealed Great Gains for Women-Owned Small Businesses Report

On November 14, the National Women’s Business Council released a new infographic demonstrating the impact of the Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program (WOSB FCP) and the increasing importance of WOSBs in government contracting.
In 2000, the Equity for Contracting for Women Act reiterated an existing goal of giving five percent of federal contracts and award dollars to women-owned small businesses; this act served as the backbone for the WOSB FCP. The WOSB FCP was implemented in the beginning of fiscal year 2011, although the analysis covers data from 2000 through the first half of 2013.  The program aims to reduce the inequity in contract and award distribution of prime federal contracts to WOSBs through the use of set-asides, and has designated 83 NAICS codes (i.e., 83 industries) in which WOSBs are underrepresented. This infographic examines the impact of the program, as well as general trends in WOSBs and federal procurement.

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ByNWBC Council

Factors Influencing the Growth of Women-Owned Businesses – Risk Tolerance, Motivations, Expectations, and Culture

Factors Influencing the Growth of Women-Owned Businesses – Risk Tolerance, Motivations, Expectations, and Culture Report

Like all entrepreneurs, women business owners face many challenges in making their entrepreneurship dreams a reality.  Some of the challenges faced by women may be specific to women, due to the historical and cultural context within which they do their work.  Women have the challenge of confronting and overcoming the historical barriers of being kept out of business and capital markets until the late 1980s.  Even today, women’s access to information (or lack thereof) about financing strategies and opportunities may be limited due to a lack of access to the social networks where many key decision makers and capital players make deals.  A lack of information about financing a business may result in more women raising lower levels of capital or pursuing only debt financing, which can limit their growth potential.  Even more challenging are the cultural and personal challenges that women may face.  Many women business owners also need to manage family-related responsibilities that still fall disproportionately on women despite progress in this area.  Finally, some women struggle with being comfortable with living through and overcoming risk and failure, a critical skill set for any entrepreneur.  Women still trail men in size of business and business receipts, and women need to become more comfortable with risk in order to grow their businesses.  All of these issues hit close to home for many successful business owners, yet, they are important to continue to explore, particularly in relation to how women start, grow, and expand their businesses.

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ByNWBC Council

National Women’s Business Council Releases Provocative Piece on Women-Led Businesses

National Women’s Business Council Releases Provocative Piece on Women-Led Businesses Report

The National Women’s Business Council released a new infographic Tuesday illustrating the significant economic clout of women-led businesses.

While many use the term ‘women-owned’ to quantify women’s economic activities in accordance with federal procurement standards, NWBC believes women–led is a more accurate measure.  Through NWBC’s new research, we have identified that successful women-led businesses have a variety of trajectories and strategies for growth.  In many cases, successful women entrepreneurs running high-growth companies have chosen to give up equity in order to raise capital.  While women-led businesses are less than 51% owned by women, women still have a significant leadership position and ownership within the company, and this matters because many of these women-led businesses are driving economic growth and disrupting the industries they are entering.

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ByNWBC Council

Data Analysis Shows Women-Owned Business Thriving, But Still Facing Obstacles

Data Analysis Shows Women-Owned Business Thriving, But Still Facing Obstacles Report

Despite the difficult economic climate during the Great Recession, women-owned businesses performed just as well as men-owned businesses during the period 2007 – 2010, and in many cases outperformed their peers.

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ByNWBC Council

NWBC Executive Director Addresses Women Veteran Entrepreneurs

NWBC Executive Director Addresses Women Veteran Entrepreneurs

Written remarks by NWBC Executive Director Anie Borja during her Jan. 12, 2013, address to the Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship (VWISE) conference in Jacksonville, FL.

ByNWBC Council

Qualitative Analysis: Intellectual Property & Women Entrepreneurs, Part II

Qualitative Analysis: Intellectual Property & Women Entrepreneurs, Part II

This second part to the NWBC research project, Intellectual Property and Women Entrepreneurs, covers the qualitative research from the original report and centers on six focus groups with women entrepreneurs and business women.  The focus groups were conducted in different parts of the nation. Two of these focus groups were with women who had successfully obtained a patent or trademark, two were with women who had applied for but did not receive a patent or trademark and the remaining two groups were with women who had never applied for a patent or trademark.

ByNWBC Council

Qualitative Analysis: Intellectual Property & Women Entrepreneurs, Part I

Qualitative Analysis Intellectual Property & Women Entrepreneurs, Part I

The number of women awarded patents has soared over the last several decades far beyond previously reported figures, and the percentage of trademarks granted to women has more than doubled, a new study commissioned by the National Women’s Business Council found.