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ByNWBC Council

NWBC Thanks You for Celebrating the 30th Anniversary of H.R. 5050

On October 25, 2018, the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) celebrated the 30th anniversary of the passage of H.R. 5050, the Women’s Business Ownership Act. Following just 103 days from introduction to passage, President Ronald Reagan signed H.R. 5050 into law on October 25, 1988. This unprecedented piece of legislation eliminated all individual state laws requiring women to have a male relative or husband co-sign a business loan, established the NWBC, the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Office of Women’s Business Ownership (OWBO), and the women’s business center program.

Congressman John LaFalce (D-NY), Chairman of the House Small Business Committee in 1987, recently reminisced on the passage of H.R.5050, “I was so pleased to learn recently that the Women’s Business Ownership Act of 1988 is now referred to as ‘The Big Bang of Women’s Entrepreneurship in America.’  That’s exactly what I set out to do when I became Chairman of the Committee – to give the economy the biggest bang I possibly could, by tapping an untapped goldmine – women entrepreneurs.” Chairman LaFalce could not have been more right. Today, there are 10 million woman business owners in the United States, accounting for nearly 40% of all businesses.

NWBC is thankful to all of the attendees who came to celebrate and commemorate the passage of H.R. 5050. The program included a reflection of the past 30 years of women’s entrepreneurship, and an impactful discussion on the future of women’s entrepreneurship. The morning began with breakfast and coffee with The Association of Women’s Business Centers (AWBC). Opening remarks were made by NWBC Executive Director Nina Roque and Assistant Administrator of the SBA’s OWBO Kathleen McShane.

The highlight of the program featured a ‘Fireside Chat’ with NWBC Chair Liz Sara and SBA Administrator Linda McMahon. The Administrator provided insights into her experience as a once small business owner, who spearheaded the expansion and growth of her company, before deciding to join the public sector. Administrator McMahon provided advice to audience members, “Know who your market is and what sets your product or service apart.” NWBC Chair Liza Sara, who is a small business founder herself, agreed, noting that “[women entrepreneurs] must think about what problem or what pain point in the market you are planning to solve.”

The passage of this legislation, and its resulting impact on women business owners, would not have been possible without the incredible and tenacious women who championed its passage. As the program went on, the audience heard from two of the trailblazers that were crucial to the passage of H.R. 5050: Virginia Littlejohn and Phyllis Hill Slater, both of whom served as Council members of the NWBC and have dedicated their careers to advocating for women entrepreneurs. Facilitated by Loreen Gilbert, Chair of The National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO)’s Institute for Entrepreneurial Development, Littlejohn and Hill Slater shared their experience as delegates to the 1980 and 1986 White House Conferences on Small Business, participating in the congressional hearings, and then leading the charge for passage of H.R. 5050.

The final panel discussion ‘Blazing Trails for the Next 30 Years’, was moderated by current NWBC Council member and Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) board member, Rose Wang. Panel participants included Bonnie Nawara, President of AWBC and current NWBC Council member, Deloris Wilson, head of strategy and operations at BEACON: The D.C. Women Founders Initiative, Julia Westfall, CEO of Hera Hub D.C., and Kelly O’Malley, D.C. Chair of The Vinetta Project. The panel provided insights into programming and policies that allow local organizations to help develop thriving entrepreneurial ecosystems for the next generation of women entrepreneurs. Panelists emphasized the value and necessity of mentorship and collaboration.

Thanks to the passage of H.R. 5050, women in business have excelled, continually reaching new heights, and the next 30 years of women’s entrepreneurship is sure to be filled with momentous milestones for women founders. NWBC is committed to continuing to advocate for women in business and to providing a platform to expand and improve opportunities for women business owners and their enterprises.

 

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ByNWBC Council

NWBC Celebrates H.R. 5050 with Dr. Terry Neese

DR. TERRY NEESE

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is celebrating the anniversary of the passage of HR5050, the Women’s Business Ownership Act. The passage of this legislation, and its resulting impact on women business owners, would not have been possible without some incredible, tenacious women that I am fortunate to have worked with. This week in particular has me reminiscing on the 1986 White House Conference on Small Business and how that set the stage for H.R. 5050. For me, on August 16, 1986 the Conference opened a door I didn’t realize was closed.  The biggest lesson we learned was that organizing, educating, and cultivating partnerships is paramount.

HR 5050 was historic – it only took 103 days from introduction to passage. On October 25, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed H.R. 5050, making it the law of the land. This unprecedented piece of legislation gave women business owners in the United States critical resources to build their enterprises and succeed in their respective fields.

To so many women around the country, including myself, H.R. 5050 was not just another piece of legislation. It was the basis on which women gain success in business. So many women start with nothing more than a great idea. It takes an incredible amount of hard work and perseverance to turn an idea into a thriving business. The group of women who strategized, working day and night to advocate for this legislation, made their mark on history, and gave women a path to follow. When you empower a woman to succeed, the nation succeeds – and the incredible women who advocated for H.R. 5050 did just that.

Throughout my career I have had the opportunity to scale my business,Terry Neese Personnel Services, was lucky enough to have been appointed to numerous councils and Boards including NWBC and NAWBO, and founded the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women (IEEW). Thirty years after the passage of H.R. 5050, I can still tell you that what the 1986 White House Conference on Small Business taught us holds true. Women entrepreneurs don’t want a handout. Like all entrepreneurs, women want a level playing field because they can play and win on any field, at any time. Understanding the barriers to opportunity, whether that is access to capital or access to information and finding strong partners in each other is crucial to success. Thanks to H.R. 5050, women in business have excelled, continually reaching new heights, not only in the United States, but also around the world.


Serial entrepreneur Dr. Terry Neese, is a lifelong Oklahoman and has spent over thirty (30) years finding careers for men and women. She is the founder of Terry Neese Personnel Services (TNPS), National Grassroots Network, Women Impacting Public Policy and the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women (IEEW).  Terry’s daughter, Kim Neese, is now the President/Owner of TNPS.

A member of the U.S. Afghan Women’s Council, past national president of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), and founder of Terry Neese Personnel Services, Dr. Neese is known as a small business expert and was recognized by Fortune magazine as one of the “Power 30”—the most influential small businesspersons in Washington, D.C.  She has been featured throughout several media outlets including MSNBC, FOX News, CNN, SBTV, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Examiner and the Washington Times.

ByNWBC Council

NWBC Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

WASHINGTON, D.C., October 2, 2018 – This Hispanic Heritage Month, the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) recognizes the tremendous contributions Hispanic women business owners have made to the U.S. economy, and anticipates great accomplishments as they continue to fulfill their entrepreneurial potential.

Research on Hispanic Women entrepreneurs conducted by NWBC finds that there are over 1.9 million Hispanic women-owned firms in the United States. These firms are growing in number, revenue, and employment. According to the 2018 State of Women-owned Businesses Report by American Express, 400 Hispanic women-owned businesses are launched each day; and since 2007, Hispanic women-owned firms have grown at a rate of 172 percent. Their economic impact is profound and is expected to increase in the coming years.

Hispanic women are also job creators. Recent U.S. Census Bureau data analyzed by the NWBC shows that from 2014-2016 employment amongst Hispanic women-owned firms grew at a rate of 14 percent. In 2016, Hispanic women employed over 570,000 workers.

“It is impressive to see how Hispanic women-owned businesses are having a major impact on job creation and economic growth in our country,” says NWBC Chair, Liz Sara, “The rate of new businesses being launched daily by Hispanic women is a testament to how their entrepreneurial spirit is shaping the new workforce of the 21st century. The National Women’s Business Council is committed to supporting Hispanic women-founded firms from startup to scale. With a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem, these firms will continue to have great success.”

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About National Women’s Business Council

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is a non-partisan federal advisory council created to serve as an independent source of advice and counsel to the President, the Congress, and the Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) on issues of impact and importance to women business owners, leaders, and entrepreneurs. To learn more about NWBC, visit www.nwbc.gov.

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ByNWBC Council

National Women’s Business Council Welcomes Liz Sara as Chairperson

WASHINGTON, D.C., August 8, 2018 – The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is pleased to welcome Liz Sara as Chairperson of the Council. On Monday, July 23, 2018, President Donald J. Trump appointed Ms. Sara, of the District of Columbia, to serve a three-year term. Ms. Sara will bring with her 30 years of achievement as an entrepreneur, business owner, and small business champion.

“Women are a vital driver of our nation’s economy, and I am thrilled that Liz will be lending her experience and savvy business leadership as she serves as Chairperson of the Council,” said SBA Administrator Linda McMahon. “Our priority is to ensure the federal government is deploying the critical resources entrepreneurs need to successfully launch small businesses and grow them.”

“I am excited to work with the Council and the teams at NWBC and SBA to help women founders blaze more trails and get the support, resources and funding they need to succeed,” Ms. Sara comments. “Leveraging my network, experience and hands-on work with entrepreneurs, I am confident we can all make a positive impact on helping women founders successfully navigate the challenges of starting and growing their business. I’m honored to be selected for this role.”

NWBC Executive Director, Nina Roque added, “I am very pleased by the appointment of Liz as Chairperson of the Council. With her leadership and entrepreneurial expertise, I am confident that together, we will elevate the voices of women business owners and entrepreneurs across this country.”

Ms. Sara is the Founder and President of Best Marketing, LLC, where she consults for more than 90 small businesses in the high-tech sector, and serves as a chief business advisor to entrepreneurs in creating and executing go-to market strategies. Previously, she played a principal role as Co-founder of SpaceWorks, an eCommerce software company, where she facilitated its startup and growth to nearly $25 million in revenue.

Ms. Sara recently completed her term as the first female Board Chair of the Dingman Center of Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. Ms. Sara is also an Adjunct Professor of Marketing at the Smith School of Business. She is an angel investor, a mentor to startup CEOs through many incubators and accelerators, and a frequent author and conference speaker on topics related to entrepreneurship and business.

Ms. Sara holds her Bachelor’s degree from the State University of New York and her Master’s degree from the University of Maryland.

 

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About National Women’s Business Council

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is a non-partisan federal advisory council created to serve as an independent source of advice and counsel to the President, the Congress, and the Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) on issues of impact and importance to women business owners, leaders, and entrepreneurs. To learn more about NWBC, visit www.nwbc.gov.

ByNWBC Council

The National Women’s Business Council Announces the Appointment of an Executive Director

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 13, 2018 — The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) today announces the appointment of Nina Roque as Executive Director.

Nina recently served as Special Assistant to the Secretary of Labor, R. Alexander Acosta, where her portfolio included apprenticeships and women in the workforce, among other policy initiatives. Prior to joining the Administration, she was the Director of Programs and External Affairs for the Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute (CHLI), a non-profit, non-partisan organization that focuses on youth development and leadership, public service and corporate responsibility. Previously, Nina was an Associate Attorney at a law firm in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she represented employers. Nina also served as a Law Clerk at the North Carolina Industrial Commission, a quasi-judicial agency in the State of North Carolina. Nina holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Criminology from Florida State University (FSU), and a Juris Doctorate from Hofstra University School of Law.

Throughout her career in the public, private and nonprofit sectors, Nina has dedicated herself to the advancement of the American workforce. Nina is a second-generation Cuban-American, who is passionate about mentoring youth leadership, empowering the American worker to succeed, and fostering an economy that allows women entrepreneurs to thrive.

“It is an honor to join the National Women’s Business Council, the federal government’s only non-partisan, independent voice for women entrepreneurs,” Roque said. “I look forward to having the opportunity to work with the members of this Council and the millions of women business owners across this country, as we continue to empower women to succeed in business.”

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About NWBC
NWBC is a non-partisan federal advisory council created to serve as an independent source of advice and counsel to the President, the Congress, and the Administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) on issues of impact and importance to women business owners, leaders, and entrepreneurs. To learn more about NWBC, visit http://www.nwbc.gov.

 

ByNWBC Council

National Women’s Business Council’s Latest Report on Women Business Owners’ Access to Markets

The National Women’s Business Council analyzed data that impacts the ability of women entrepreneurs and business owners to access markets. 

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ByNWBC Council

The National Women’s Business Council Releases Reports on Success Factors for Women Business Owners’ Use of Crowdfunding

The National Women’s Business Council analyzed Kickstarter and Kiva data to identify the key determinants of success for women business owners and entrepreneurs.

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 27, 2018 – The National Women’s Business Council today released two new research reports commissioned to identify the key determinants of success for women entrepreneurs, which would facilitate a better understanding of the policy implications of crowdfunding and its promise for small business finance in the U.S. To do this, the Council examined two crowdfunding platforms, Kickstarter and Kiva.  Crowdfunding as a Capital Source for Women Entrepreneurs: Case Study of Kiva, a Non-profit Lending Crowdfunding Platform and Crowdfunding as a Capital Source for Women Entrepreneurs: Case Study of Kickstarter, a Reward- Based Crowdfunding Platform analyze the role of an entrepreneur’s/small business owner’s online social network and examine additional factors that may affect success rates in crowdfunding such as funding goal or length of campaign. Download the full reports and review other research on access to capital at http://www.nwbc.gov.

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ByNWBC Council

This Women’s History Month our Council Members share their inspiring entrepreneurial journeys.


microphone imageWhen it comes to building, running and growing your own business, our Council Members have learned a thing or two. Whether you are just starting out or are more established, entrepreneurship is not without its ups and downs. Starting a business on your own can be a challenging, exhilarating, exhausting, and yet incredibly rewarding experience
In honor of Women’s History Month, the NWBC Council Members would like to take the opportunity to share – in their own words – some valuable tips, insights and inspiration to what has enabled them to reach the levels of success they never thought possible.

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