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ByNWBC Council

Atlanta, A Trailblazing City Recap

Just last week, the Council headed South to Atlanta, GA for our August Public Meeting, entitled Atlanta, A Trailblazing City: The Importance of Diversity and Innovation in Entrepreneurship.  This public meeting highlighted the dynamism and immense growth of Atlanta’s entrepreneurial ecosystem, specific to women entrepreneurs. Why Atlanta might you ask? Well, Atlanta, in particular has been ranked in the top 3 amongst the 25 most populous metropolitan areas for the growth of women-owned businesses. In the most recent Survey of Business Owners (2012), there are an estimated 376,506 women-owned enterprises in Georgia, make sure to look at the Georgia state fact sheet. Georgia leads the nation in such growth, particularly for black women entrepreneurs– a tremendous increase of 98,216 enterprises from 2007.

 

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ByNWBC Council

State Policies: Aiding and Promoting Women’s Entrepreneurship and Business Ownership

Starting a business? You may want to consider moving to another state. Looking at trends in the development of women-owned businesses, it is apparent that some parts of the country are magnets for entrepreneurship and rapid-growth, while other state business ecosystems are not as flourishing.[1] In an effort to better understand what makes a successful entrepreneurial ecosystem, the Council has launched the ecosystem project, and has been traveling to various cities across the country to learn more about the support system needed to facilitate high-growth in women-owned businesses. Recently, the Council released state factsheets, which reveal 2012 survey results of business owners on a state-by-state basis. These fact sheets illustrate, compositionally, how the business sector in each state is broken up—by race/ethnicity and industry—as well as fast facts such as percentage of women-owned businesses and generated employment opportunities. However, these state fact sheets only give a broad overview of each state’s business ecosystem; they do not provide adequate information as to what, exactly, each state supports or, in some cases, hinders women’s entrepreneurship.

 

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ByNWBC Council

SBA Administrator Appoints New Members to the National Women’s Business Council

WASHINGTON – Maria Contreras-Sweet, Administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), announced today that she has appointed two new members to the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC).  Effective immediately, Jen Earle, CEO of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), and Rose Wang, serial entrepreneur and Women Impacting Public Policy Representative, will each serve a three-year appointment to the council, which advises the President, Members of Congress and the SBA on important issues that impact women business owners, leaders, and entrepreneurs.

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ByNWBC Council

Generating Buzz about “Generation Z”

As the clichéd saying goes, “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” However, this is just what eleven-year-old entrepreneur and philanthropist Mikaila Ulmer did after getting stung by a bee. She admits that although at first scared of bees, she became fascinated by their niche and the growing honey bee epidemic.[1] In response to plight of the honey bee, Ulmer came up with Me & the Bees a lemonade company—that uses honey as a natural sweeter—and donates a percentage of its profits to local and international organizations dedicated to ameliorating the condition of bees. Little did Ulmer know that her small lemonade stand would expand into the multi-million-dollar industry that is it today. A couple months ago, Ulmer signed a major deal with Whole Foods so that her sweet treat will appear in more than 55 stores in four southern states: Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana.[2]

 

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ByNWBC Council

Is Social Entrepreneurship the Business Model of the 21st Century?

“Buy one, give one!” “Buy from x company and we’ll donate a share of those profits to…” “These products are locally sourced and benefit our community.”

 

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ByNWBC Council

Call for Applications: NWBC Communications and Engagement Fellow (Fall 2016)

Background:

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is searching for a Communications and Engagement Fellow to join the team for a three-month minimum term this fall (flexible start date).  The Communications and Engagement Fellow will assist in executing the effective outreach and engagement strategy in place. The Fellow will assist in crafting messages and materials to promote and publicize the activities of the Council, its programs and goals. The fellow will also monitor breaking news, policy efforts and/or related initiatives to maintain a working knowledge of significant developments and trends in the field.

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ByNWBC Council

Call for Applications: NWBC Research Fellow (Fall 2016)

Background:

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) is searching for a Research Fellow to join the team for a three-month minimum term, beginning in September 2016 (specific start date flexible).  The Research Fellow will support the Council’s Research team on the mission-critical initiatives of the Council. This is a great opportunity for students looking to apply their knowledge of economics and government in a real-world setting. This fellowship is unpaid and based in Washington, DC.  This is a part-time fellowship, with a minimum requirement of 15 hours per week.

 

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ByNWBC Council

Beyond the Start-Up: Strategies to Scale-Up Recap

We had a great Public Meeting last week – and are excited to share a brief recap with you.

But before we get to that, I want to reiterate our thanks to three of our beloved Council Members who have joined us for their final Council meeting and will be cycling off the Council: Kristie Arslan, Shelly Kapoor Collins and Laura Yamanaka. Thank you for your tremendous service to the work of the Council in supporting women entrepreneurs, giving us critical insights on our research endeavors and policy recommendations, and aiding us with our public engagement efforts.

 

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ByNWBC Council

National Women’s Business Council Announces New Online Resource Platform for Growth- Aspiring Women Entrepreneurs

New Platform Will Improve Access to Resources Required for High-Growth Women-Owned Businesses

WASHINGTON–The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) today unveiled Grow Her Business: A Resource from Start-up to Scale-up, an online, searchable repository of nearly 200 premiere, growth-oriented programs for entrepreneurs. This new directory will connect entrepreneurs to the resources they need to obtain capital, build industry knowledge and develop the skills needed to meet high-growth objectives.

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ByNWBC Council

Supplier diversity, scale-up, and strategies for success: Outcomes from Research on Women’s Participation in Corporate Supplier Diversity Programs, Part 1

I’m writing this post from 30,000 feet, as I return home from Orlando, Florida where, over the past week, several members of the NWBC have been “creating magic together” at the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) National Conference and Business Fair.  Though the highlights were many—including opportunities to hear from established women business owners, learn more about the certification process, and visit Epcot Center—perhaps the most exciting part of the trip was the opportunity to meet and talk to several engaged and innovative corporate supplier diversity leaders in attendance.

 

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