ByNWBC Council

2007 Annual Report

2007 Annual Report

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The members of the National Women’s Business Council worked together throughout Fiscal Year 2007 to promote policies and programs designed to support women’s entrepreneurship. Over the past year, the Council’s activities focused primarily on the following areas: communications and outreach, research, and policy engagement.

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Study of Women-Owned and Led Businesses: An Overview of the Data in NWBC’s Special Tabulations

Study of Women-Owned and Led Businesses: An Overview of the Data in NWBC’s Special Tabulations

Using custom datasets from the Census Bureau’s 2002 Survey of Business Owners and Self-Employed Persons (SBO), this report assesses the economic impact of women-owned and women-led firms on the U.S. economy by examining their receipts, compensation, geography, industry, and ethnography. This study indicates that the economic contributions of women business owners are greater than previously reported.

ByNWBC Council

Key Contributions of Women-Led Businesses

Key Contributions of Women-Led Businesses

The economic impact of women business owners has long gone understated, according to a new two-part study released by the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) today. Based on custom datasets from the Census Bureau’s 2002 Survey of Business Owners and Self-Employed Persons (SBO), the reports assess the economic impact of women-owned and women-led firms on the U.S. economy by examining their receipts, compensation, geography, industry, and ethnography. The 2002 SBO is the most current information available on the distribution and contribution of women-led businesses.

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ByNWBC Council

Voices from the Field: A Report from the National Women’s Business Council Town Hall Meetings

Voices from the Field: A Report from the National Women’s Business Council Town Hall Meetings

In March and June 2007, the National Women’s Business Council held two town hall meetings with women business owners in St. Louis, Missouri and in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the meetings was to collect viewpoints and ideas from women business owners that could inform the Council’s policy positions and their future recommendations to government leaders. This report outlines policy issues that are relevant to women business owners and summarizes the content of the town hall meetings as it relates to those policy issues.

ByNWBC Council

2006 Annual Report

2006 Annual Report Download Annual Report

Fiscal Year 2006 was one of transition and growth for the National Women’s Business Council. Over the course of the year, eight Council members completed their terms and five new women joined the Council. Together, the members of the Council worked throughout the year to promote policies and programs designed to support women’s entrepreneurship.

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ByNWBC Council

Explaining State-Level Differences in Women-Owned Business Performance

Explaining State-Level Differences in Women-Owned Business Performance

The National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) today released a new study, Explaining State- Level Differences in Women-Owned Business Performance, which indicates that the success of women-owned businesses is impacted by particular state-level factors, such as the availability of technology infrastructure and an educated workforce. Using the U.S. Census Bureau’s special tabulations of 1997-2001 data on women-owned businesses’ (WOB) performance, the research is one of the first attempts to evaluate systematically the influence of factors that underlie state differences in WOB performance.

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ByNWBC Council

Best Practices in Federal Procurement: A Study of the Successes and Barriers for Women-Owned Businesses

Best Practices in Federal Procurement A Study of the Successes and Barriers for Women-Owned Businesses

Based on a procurement roundtable discussion held at a meeting of the National Women’s Business Council (NWBC) in 2004, the NWBC commissioned a study of the best practices of small business advocates in federal government agencies. The small business office in most federal agencies is called the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU). Other agencies, such as the Department of Defense and General Services Administration, have different names for their offices — Office of Small Business Programs (DOD) and Office of Small Business Utilization (GSA). The name OSDBU not only refers to the offices themselves, but also to the advocates within them. Many OSDBU offices designate women-owned business advocates to whom the responsibility of working with women business owners falls. The goal of this project was to identify OSDBU best practices which result in more effective assistance to small, women-owned businesses involved in federal contracting.

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2005 Annual Report

2005 Annual Report Download Annual Report

Fiscal Year 2005 continued the active and inclusive approach set over the past three years by the National Women’s Business Council.

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ByNWBC Council

Accessing Government Markets: An Issues Roundtable Discussion

Accessing Government Markets: An Issues Roundtable Discussion

The National Women’s Business Council convened a roundtable discussion of government officials and women business owners in September to air issues and concerns for achieving the five-percent goal for federal procurement by women-owned businesses. The Council has just released the transcript and summary report of this Roundtable as well as an NWBC Research in Brief summarizing the issues raised at the roundtable and program recommendations.

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ByNWBC Council

2004 Annual Report

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Fiscal Year 2004 continued the active and inclusive tone set over the past two years, with the publication of numerous research reports, Issues in Brief, and Fact Sheets; the hosting of several well-attended issue discussion events; broad communication via the Council’s Web site and the issuance of press releases and an electronic newsletter; and activism in the public policy arena.

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